LinkedIn Is The New … Minesweeper?

In 2011, I wrote a blog post titled, Why Skype Is The New Solitaire, where I predicted that Skype would become commonplace in business once it was integrated with Microsoft Office and installed on every Windows computer.  Of course, it didn’t take a a crystal ball to see the future of the video conferencing, and I don’t take any credit for my divination skills. I do take credit for the witty Solitaire analogy, and this here witty-titled post is meant to be a “sequel” to that first post…

Last month (June 2016), Microsoft announced plans to acquire LinkedIn. This adds leverage to their current CRM software, by adding a large social network of adults, who are mostly professional.  I say mostly, because lately there has a been a surge of worthless content on Linkedin.  I hope this deal makes LinkedIn more about business, and less BS.

I used to praise LinkedIn for relevant content, and its gotten me more leads than any other online source. There is no definitive date of when The Old LinkedIn became what LinkedIn is today, but I personally felt the shift when the occasional annoying recruiters in my Inbox were suddenly outnumbered by periodic junk mail messages:

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But these messages don’t annoy me nearly as much as what I call the math problem posts, here is an example:

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2732 Likes and 14506 comments on a math problem that a grade school student should be able to solve?   And for the record, the answer is -13. Following the order of operations, you first reduce the multiplier and multiplicand (3×6) and put their product (18) back in the equation 3-18+2 = -13.  But why is this on LinkedIn? Why?  Because you Like it, that’s why.

Let’s push the math problems off to the side for now, and look at how the LinkedIn / Microsoft deal could actually help your business to grow, work more efficiently, and sell more effectively, by adding functionality to your desktop, tablet, phone, or Surface Hub:

  • Minesweeper_XPThe Contact List Convergence–  You meet someone at a trade show, and send a LI request to be connected.  They accept, and are automatically added to your Outlook email contact list.  You send them an Outlook Meeting Request.
  • Office LinkedIn 365 – It will be easier to share presentations and edit documents within LI groups.  You will see live chats and webinars emerge within LinkedIn Groups.  Maybe there will be local LinkedIn Groups within your Exchange Server?
  • Skype Within LinkedIn – You see a job you like on LinkedIn and apply for it. A day later, you are asked to meet on Linkedin for your first interview, using Skype For Business.

These are just 3 examples of changes you may see as a result of the the Linkedin-Microsoft merger, but you need to be careful. Just like “Mr. Softy” got half of the world hooked on Solitaire and Minesweeper, many of you will soon be using LinkedIn and Skype on a daily basis. Don’t believe me?  Just try it, the first one’s free. Here’s a free download of Windows 10, and free Microsoft Word for your Ipad…. Look, a Skype button, let’s test it!  Wait, why is this sending an email to all of my Linkedin Contacts?  And what’s with all these math problems?

My Do’s And Don’ts Of LinkedIn Profile Photos

Social Media Networking

Audio & Video Chat Software

 

 

Black and white professional headshot

A New Road For PK Audiovisual

By Paul Konikowski, CTS-D

About five years ago, I decided to become an independent consultant, doing business as PK Audiovisual. Now I am starting a new chapter in my career, working full-time as a Multimedia Solutions Architect with Strategic Products and Services (SPS).   As much as I enjoy running my own business, I believe this new position will provide me more job security and opportunity for growth moving forward.  I will be working side by side with sales, meeting with clients, and generating accurate Unified Communications proposals.

I feel like I am at a major crossroads in my life, and before I hit the road, I would like to take a few moments to look back at the variety of projects I worked on dba (doing business as) PK Audiovisual:

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  • Designing the audio, video, and control systems for a new high school auditorium in Humboldt County
  • Retrofitting an older distance learning classroom
  • Blogging and working at trade shows with WiSA
  • Helping Revolabs build their social media networks
  • Specifying new conference rooms for StichFix.com
  • Helping non-profit groups like Sustainable Fairfax
  • Ghostwriting blog posts, whitepapers, and articles

As you can see from the above, I have not been a typical AV consultant who “just” designs audio and video systems. One reason I started PK Audiovisual was that I saw the need for better social media marketing in the AV industry. Trade shows have always been interesting to me, and working them was an awesome experience, but what I have really enjoyed the most while running my own business was the ghostwriting of blogs, magazine articles, and whitepapers.

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Ghostwriting is when you do the bulk of the writing for another person or company, who then edits and publishes it as their own. I like to tell people, you don’t get credit, but you get cash. I have met other ghostwriters, and we have agreed that its often better to be in the shadows, than in the byline, because it gives the writer more liberty.

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My new position with SPS will allow me to use my writing skills in crafting proposals, and I will continue to write posts on the weekends.  PKaudiovisual.com will always be my personal blog, and I hope to find other opportunities for thought leadership in the audiovisual and unified communications spaces.  I want to thank everyone who supported PK Audiovisual over the last five years, especially the readers, guest bloggers, and former clients.  It has been a pleasure.

Just Say No To Bad Swag

I recently received a letter from a well-known “automobile association”, thanking me for being a member for the past twenty years.  Just to be clear, the only reason I continue to be a member is this: about once a year, I need a jump-start, or I lock my keys in my car and need a locksmith, or I need a tow, or a friend needs a jump-start, locksmith or a tow. (Pro tip: you can utilize your membership benefits, even if its not your car, as long as you are a passenger in the vehicle.)  The membership pays for itself with the money that I save.

The letter also informed me that, in appreciation for my 20 years of loyalty, I should stop by the nearest office and pick up my free license plate frame, informing every driver that is behind me that I was a 20 year+ member of the association. Ummmm, no thank you.  What good does this license plate frame do for me? Is an attractive woman going to ask me out me on a date when they see it?  Will it get me out of a speeding ticket?   No, its just more marketing for the company. Consider this my first example of “bad swag”.

Swag“can mean a lot of things; in this blog post, it means promotional merchandise.

Second example: I received junk mail from an automobile insurance company (notice a trend here?) looking for me to switch my current automobile coverage to theirs.  The envelope included a bumper sticker that plainly stated “PLEASE DON’T HIT ME! I am not 100% sure about my coverage”.  To their credit, I was amused by the bumper sticker campaign, but did this company really expect me to put this ugly sticker on my bumper?

Many people in the AV industry think of trade shows when they hear the word “swag”. Most booths offer some form of it: pens, reusable grocery bags, magnets, t-shirts, candy, paperweights, key chains, flashlights, headlamps, miniature screwdrivers, and plenty of those little foam things that you are supposed to squeeze when you are stressed.  I remember one booth had flying monkey toys that you could launch across the room. 99%  of these promotional items have a company logo and/or marketing tagline printed on them.  Some items become “gifts” for the kids once the attendee gets home from the trip.

Aside from the pens and reusable grocery bags, most of the swag you get is garbage.  I keep a few of the foam-stress-relief-thingees around my desk, and squeeze them periodically to exercise my hands and fingers, helping to avoid Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.  I don’t ever remember being stressed out, squeezing one for a minute, and then feeling less stressed.

What blows my mind is how much money is wasted on this bad swag!  Not to mention the hours spent by marketing departments and/or company owners to “design” this crap: the t-shirts in awful colors chosen to match the company’s logo, covered in industry-related marketing taglines, or sometimes even images of the products.  Who on earth would wear these outside of mowing the lawn, changing your oil, or sealing the driveway?  There is one group who is happy to get these shirts: homeless people.  I love it when I see a homeless person wearing a promotional t-shirt, because it means the shirt is being used, not just thrown away.  Probably not what the marketing team had in mind, but hey, at least the catchy tagline created by the marketing guru is actually being read by someone, right?

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Original image courtesy of Rapgenius on Amazon Web Services

As much as I am a sucker for free stuff, I do my best to avoid accepting this bad swag; although sometimes, I can’t say no, because its mailed directly to me (“Enjoy your lapel pin…”.) As a waste-conscious citizen, I seriously don’t know if I should toss it, recycle it, donate it, or spend the money to ship it back to them, with a note saying, “WTF were you thinking?  You just wasted time and money on something no one will ever use!”

Occasionally, someone gets it right.  For example, one manufacturer’s rep I know quietly hands out $10 Starbucks gift cards to people who engage her at the trade show booth.  These gift cards have no tag lines, no logos (other than the Starbucks logo).  I have not seen her in years, only because I have not attended those same trade shows.  And yet I specifically remember her giving me that gift card, as well as the company she represents.

Other companies have sponsored outings like dinner cruises, baseball games, even paintball.  Those were very fun, very memorable times, and I was able to share the experience with coworkers and loved ones.  And just like the Starbucks card, I remember exactly what company sponsored those events, as well as the people representing them.

So please, marketing gurus, take note:  the next time you are about to “pull the trigger” on your latest sky-blue or lime-green t-shirt, the one with your latest tagline on the front and your logo on the sleeve, think to yourself:  Would I actually wear this?  Would anyone I know actually wear this?  What is this costing my company?  And would we be better off just handing out gift cards, or even the cash equivalent?  Now THAT would be memorable!